Community organising and the Dublin drugs (heroin) crisis

Heroin has killed hundreds of young people in Dublin since the 1980's. It has hit the poorest working class communities. These communities have organised a number of anti - drug campaigns in response to this crisis.Death walking on skulls

Legalise it
The legaisation of Cannabis is now being debated openly by sections of the European ruling class.

The heroin menace
Dublin is experiencing a heroin epidemic similar to the in the late 1970s. That epidemic left hundreds of young people hooked on heroin and dozens of them have since died of AIDS and AIDS related diseases. Some big criminals made fortunes out of it

Bans or legalisation?
SINCE THE DAYS of Concerned Parents Against Drugs (CPAD), the growth of the heroin problem in inner-city Dublin has largely gone without comment. In the last few months, two factors have pushed it back into the spotlight - the government's declaration of a 'War on Drugs', and the emergence of the city-wide campaign against heroin which has been set up by Inner City Organisations Network.

Direct Action Against Drugs: Murder & Thuggery
}MEN SHOT DEAD, many more beaten up. Attacks in Armagh, Belfast, Derry, Dublin, Dundalk and Kerry. In most cases the reason given was that the people being punished were ecstasy dealers. The murders in the six counties were claimed by Direct Action Against Drugs.

Drug Crisis: Dublin Communities Organise
The heroin epidemic in Dublin is causing major problems for addicts and for the communities where they live. Oddly enough you would not get any inkling of this crisis from the bourgeois press. That is because the epidemic and its effects are confined to the inner city and the working class suburbs like Ballymun, Tallaght, Clondalkin and Blanchardstown.

Communities stand up to the heroin barons
Dublin is experiencing a very serious heroin epidemic with an estimated 8,000-9,000 heroin addicts. Heroin addiction is closely related to disadvantage and poverty. The anti-heroin movement has brought thousands of people to meetings and onto the streets in Dublin's working class communities

The Drugs Debate
We continue the discussion about the heroin crisis, this time with two readers' letters. Your views are welcome.

Pushers Out: Poverty Out too
The Heroin crisis continues in Dublin, we examine how it is rooted in poverty

Crime and community policing
The term 'community policing' has been much abused in recent times, most particularly in the North of Ireland where it has become shorthand for vicious punishment beatings and shootings. In this article Gregor Kerr takes a look at the issue of community policing - what it is and more importantly what it isn't. The question of what levels of real community policing would actually be possible or allowed under capitalism is looked at, and the debate about crime, anti-social behaviour and reactions to it in an anarchist society is touched on.

Pushers Out! - The inside story of Dublin's anti-drugs movement
Pushers Out tells the story of how people living in the North Inner City and the South Inner City organised to save their communities from heroin. Not relying on the state to solve their problems, they started to organise themselves. One such working class organisation is Coalition of Communities Against Drugs (COCAD) A review of the book by by Andre Lyder


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News of Anarchism in Ireland

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Related articles

Crime, Criminals, Punishment an anarchist view
Kropotkin came up with three types of crime. Property related crime, government related crime and crimes against the person. In Britain it has been estimated that 94% of crime is committed against property. However what isn't recorded are those crimes committed for property.

Incorporation...the spoonful of sugar
Why is it that many single issue campaigns and community groups which start out with a radical program soon end up as little more than service groups? Conor Mc Loughlin, an activist of the now defunct Portobello Unemployed Action Group investigates.


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